Roby Cross

by Martin

The site is on the southerly side of the road, between Liverpool and Prescot, distant three miles in a south-westerly direction from the latter town. The remains consist of a portion of the shaft, four

feet six inches in height and twelve inches square, socketted into a venerable pedestal, two feet six inches square on plan and twelve inches thick. The pedestal is carried on a step eight inches wide. There may be other steps buried in the ground. The shaft looks newer than the pedestal. A villager named Hesketh told me in April, 1900, that this cross was called “The Stocks” by the people about, and old inhabitants remember seeing men in the stocks, which were close to the cross. An old inn used to be opposite. It appears to have been a custom to place this instrument of punishment for drunkenness opposite the principal inn.

There is still a good deal of old-world character about this village, which is three-quarters of a mile south-west from Huyton. Roby was in that ancient parish. Baines states that in 1304 Robert de Lathom had a charter for a market and fair for his manor of Robye. It is quite possible, therefore, that the cross which I have just described was the ancient market cross, standing in the market place, which has disappeared under the Enclosures Act.

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