Related Sites

There are a couple of ways to find out more about Liverpool history on the World Wide Web.

Diigo Bookmarks

All the Historic Liverpool bookmarks are collected at Diigo.com in a group tagged – yes –

Liverpool – bookmarks at Diigo” href=”https://www.diigo.com/user/mdgreaney/historic_liverpool?type=all&sort=updated”>Historic Liverpool. There’s no real order to them, but you can search through them by tag, so explore at leisure.

Here are a few to whet your appetite:

Some of my other bookmarks are related to the technology used to construct this site, should you want to do something similar. More details of this technology can be found on under About Historic Liverpool. I will endeavour to curate them more usefully at some not too distant point.

Social Media

You can also join in the conversation on Twitter and Facebook. Join us for maps, photos, reminiscences and more!

3 responses to “Related Sites”

  1. MICHAEL QUIGLEY says:

    DO YOU HAVE ANY INFO ON C.PERRY LTD OF TOXTETH PARK,
    I RECENTLY PURCHASED FROM A CURIO SHOP IN LARK LANE A SEALED
    STONEWARE FLAGON DATED 1935 WITH THE SAID NAME ON IT.

    REGARDS

    MJ QUIGLEY.

    • Martin says:

      Hi Michael,

      This is quite a tough one. Is this similar to the kind of flagon you have? http://www.belowstairs.co.uk/acatalog/Online_Catalogue_Bottles___Stoneware_Flagons_57.html

      I’ve found a reference to Perry the brewer in Pengwern Street near Princes Park in Toxteth, from Gore’s Directory for 1900. This may be the company that made the bottle you have.

      [It’s on page 1128 of the 1900 Directory; search http://www.historicaldirectories.org.uk

      Dock workers took flagons of beer with them to work – to keep them going! – as well as other manual workers. The docks, and the area of land just behind the docks were heavily industrialised parts of Liverpool right up until the Second World War. Many of these places still are.

      What you have is one of the interesting little details that show what objects people were using every day. These flagons may have remained unchanged over decades – it’s an interesting part of Liverpool’s manual dock labour.

      If anyone else reading this has any ideas, do add them below!

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