Liverpool History Shop

Almost all the old maps on this site can be bought as high quality prints, great for framing, and as a present!

There’s also the book – Liverpool: a landscape history, also available to buy from this website.

Go to the shop

Extract from an old map of Liverpool

Old maps

There are always new maps being added to the site.

There are currently over 25 old maps, from the 17th to the 20th century. Explore your local area over 300 years!

Browse old maps

Interactive maps

Some maps to help you discover the Liverpool of your ancestors.

  • Explore the suburbs and historic townships
  • Search for the long-gone old streets of Liverpool where your ancestors lived
  • Look up churches, parishes, listed buildings and more

Extract from the interactive townships map
Historic suburbs

Explore the local histories of the ‘townships’, as well as the centre of Liverpool itself.

Read township histories
Victorian parishes

All the parishes in the Liverpool area and slightly beyond, as they were in 1851. There are also some Anglican churches from the era.

You can see details about when they were built (and demolished) where that information is known.

Find old parishes
Old streets

The streets of Liverpool within the boundary of Queens Drive, as they were before vast swathes were demolished in the 20th century.

You can search for a road using the box in the top left of the map.

Locate an old street
Listed buildings

All of Liverpool’s most important architecture, with a search tool to boot.

Data comes from Historic England, the government body responsible for protecting the Listed Buildings in England.

Search listed buildings
Natural landscapes

Liverpool’s history is founded upon millions of years of natural landscapes.

The Mersey is only the most famous of a series of geological and water features, all of which contribute something to the historic landscape.

Discover natural landscapes
Extract from the interactive townships map

Get maps, share maps, fly!

All the content on this website is released under a Creative Commons license, which means you’re free to share them on social media, or as part of your own project.

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