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Ridge and Furrow, West Derby

Ridge and Furrow formations are possibly one of the best-known archaeological features which survive into the modern day. These long, sinuous raises beds of earth can be seen across Britain, from train (more…)

West Derby Yeoman’s House up for sale

This is an exciting post to write, although the topic is often bitter-sweet. The so-called ‘Yeoman’s House’ in the centre of West Derby village is currently up for sale, for the princely (or yeomanly) (more…)

Paton Street from the air

A question came in back in October 2016, looking for information on Paton Street in Kirkdale. I couldn’t find out any information on this myself, as there were few clues. However, Phil D came to rescue (more…)

Rail remains of Liverpool Riverside Station

Following the curve of Princes Parade, on the north west side of Princes Dock, are a set of rails which are one of the few clues left to the presence of Liverpool Riverside Station.

Today the rails (more…)

Parkside Drive – a West Derby bypass?

Plans were once put together to make West Derby a more peaceful village. Only a few clues now remain to those plans.

Martin’s Note: I’m indebted to the West Derby Society again for revealing this feature (more…)

Speke Hall and the Speke Estate

Speke Hall is one of the most famous historical features on Merseyside. Its distinctive black and white appearance, highlighting its amazing timber structure, make it a memorable sight for visitors.

Speke (more…)

Clarke Gardens Pillbox, Allerton

There is an octagonal pillbox in the grounds of Allerton Hall, seemingly ‘defending’ Springwood Avenue from an invisible army. While many no doubt pass it day to day without a second thought, a lot of (more…)

Calderstones

The Calderstones name refers these days to a group of six megaliths (large stones) which stand in a greenhouse in Calderstones Park. These are the remains of a Neolithic burial chamber which once stood (more…)

Blackburne Place ventilation shaft and the Wapping Tunnel

This red brick and sandstone tower on Blackburne Place is a beautiful ventilation shaft for a railway which once ran beneath it, and could be seen as representing the tunnel and railway in a nutshell.

The (more…)

Robin Hood’s Stone

Robin Hood’s Stone (or the Robin Hood Stone) is a Neolithic or Bronze Age standing stone currently to be found within a set of railings on the corner of Booker Avenue and Archerfield Road. It originally (more…)

Camp Hill Iron Age enclosure, Woolton

In the woods above Woolton lie mysterious remains, amounting to little more than some dry stone walls, in a location reputed to have once held so much more.

Camp Hill is a name which suggests a settlement, (more…)

Teagle (crane) at 11 Dale Street

In the Victorian period Liverpool was Britain’s second greatest port (London being the first), and there are hundreds of remnants of Liverpool’s trading golden age dotted around the landscape.

We’re (more…)

Everton Beacon

Liverpool has always been a trading port, and so it’s no surprise that features have come and gone in the landscape which sought to make this as easy and safe as possible.

Everton Beacon was one such (more…)

Springfield Park Prescot Road entrance

The recent rebuilding of Alder Hey Hospital has drawn my attention to Springfield Park in a bigger way than for many years. The scale of the changes took me by surprise, and though I love the new building (more…)

Hartley Quay Dock Railway

As the Liverpool Docks expanded along the Mersey, they came face to face with a challenge which other cities did not: ships docked further and further from the central business district. Places like Manchester (more…)

Sanctuary Stone, Castle Street

There are all sorts of stories associated with the Sanctuary Stone. Its name conjures up anything from slave-related scenes to cheeky apple snatching medieval urchins. You might never see the same story (more…)

St George’s Dock road sign

Liverpool, as a city, is master of reinventing itself, and re-using parts of its landscape when priorities (and economics) change. The Pier Head area is perhaps the greatest example of this, not least (more…)

Huyton Village Cross

The church (dedicated to S. Michael) is of ancient foundation. The ornamentation of the font testifies to the pre-Norman date of the edifice. A handsome cross was erected on the village green, near the (more…)

Garston Churchyard Cross

Mr. Cox writes (in 1888): “The base of the churchyard cross still lies opposite the site of the old south porch.” There is, however, some doubt whether this stone is the base of the cross, or the base (more…)

Much Woolton Cross

The ancient village of Much Woolton is two miles and a half inland from the bank of the Mersey and six and a half miles in a south-easterly direction from Walton-on-the-Hill. The Knights of S. John of (more…)

Knotty Cross

These words occur on the six-inch ordnance map at the intersection of roads one-third of a mile south-east from the centre of Gateacre village and about half a mile in a north-easterly direction from Much (more…)

Hunt’s Cross

The words “pedestal of stone cross” occur on the 1848 six-inch ordnance map at “Hunt’s Cross,” close to Hunt’s Cross Station, at the intersection of Hunt’s Cross Lane and Sandy Lane, two miles inland from (more…)

Garston Village Cross

Mr. Cox writes: “The other cross stood below the rock on which was built Garston Hall at the head of the mill-dam, and just opposite to the bridge where the stream entered the pool; its site would be near (more…)

Brook House Farm

Brook House Farm is the name given to an Iron Age farmstead site in Halewood. It consists of an enclosure surrounded by two ditches (one large and one small), and was discovered via an aerial photograph (more…)

Church Street Cross

The Church Street cross is a brass maltese cross which can be seen at the entrance to the passage through to School Lane, in front of what was HMV. The plaque stands at the position of the altar inside (more…)

Ditton Brook

Ditton Brook makes up the northern boundary of Halewood, and flows in a south-westerly direction before flowing out into the River Mersey between the town of Ditton and Hale Bank. Along with the River (more…)

River Alt

The River Alt flows north east through Lancashire and Merseyside. It rises in Huyton township at the Hag Plantation, and flows through Croxteth Park, West Derby and Maghull, then flows out to the Mersey (more…)

Everton Cross

A water-colour drawing in the Binns Collection shows this cross in an open space near a cottage. A church appears in the distance. The head of the cross is gone, but a portion of the square shaft is shown (more…)

Childwall Cross

The word “cross” in Gothic letters appears on the 1848 map one and a half miles east of Wavertree. Mr. Cox thus describes it in the Transactions of the Historic Society of Lancashire and Cheshire (volume (more…)

Everton Well

Mr. Hope writes in his Legendary Lore of the Holy Wells of England: “There is a well here which has the reputation of being haunted, a fratricide having been committed there. It was a haunt of pick-pockets (more…)