History of Bootle

Bootle began its history as a large, well-defined village completely separate from Liverpool. But as the city expanded, Bootle found itself well-placed during the expansion in the Industrial Revolution. It soon bulged with incoming labourers, who took advantage of the tram and rail networks to get to work at the docks, and became packed with industrial buildings of all types.

Soon, like other ‘lost villages’, Bootle was swallowed up in the expanding metropolis, but traces of the original hamlet can still be picked out today.

Boltelai (Domesday Book); Botle, 1212, 1237; Botull, 1306; Bothull, 1332; Bothell, 1348. (VCH Lancs: III)

Origins of the name: Anglo Saxon Bold or Botle, dwelling.

The Seaside Resort

The original village of Bootle sat at the junction of Merton Road and Litherland Road. The location is just over a mile from the River Mersey, and Bootle became known as a seaside resort, with Merton Road leading down the hill to the sea.

Towards the middle of the 19th Century, however, Bootle was already starting to see the effects of the expansion of Liverpool to the south.

Bootle on the Ordnance Survey map of 1851

Bootle on the Ordnance Survey map of 1851

The 1851 Ordnance Survey First Edition shows Bootle clearly as still a separate village, bounded by Merton Road, Bootle Road (now Hawthorne Road) and Litherland Road. There was no north bounding street (where today there is Waterworks Street), but Bootle Water Works was already in existence by this point.

Bootle’s future as a centre for industry was already being mapped out: the Bootle Chemical Works sat just north of the village centre, the Leeds Liverpool Canal skirted the villlage to the west, and the Liverpool, Crosby and Southport Railway and the Liverpool, Blackburn and Accrington Line of the Lancashire and Yorkshire Railway passed on either side.

However, at this early stage in history these great transport links seem to ignore Bootle on their drive towards the more important centre of Liverpool itself.

The docks would also grow to be a major part of Bootle’s future, but in 1851 only a few docks stretched this far north of Liverpool. Instead there was a thick strip of waterside buildings from Liverpool Road (now Seaforth Road) down to Bankfield Street in Kirkdale.

These houses were built in rows, and included hotels and pubs.

Bootle Castle sat just north of the northernmost dock (Canada Half Tide Dock), and a church dedicated to St Mary can be seen in what is now the cemetery at Church Gardens. Bootle School was another civic building in the area.

Roads in existence in the mid-19th Century show that great plans were afoot for Bootle. A large area south of the village had already been laid out by 1851, with a handful of roads named after Oxford colleges: in addition to Merton there was Wadham Place and Balliol Road (to be joined by others later). This arrangement of roads without buildings is a tell-tale sign that planners saw potential for this area to grow in the coming years.

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The Railways Arrive; Bootle Explodes

Bootle on the Ordnance Survey map of 1894

By the end of the 19th Century Bootle is in the midst of a huge phase of expansion, perhaps more than most other outlying parts of Liverpool at this time. The village itself had already been swallowed by the hungry city, although it remained close to the edge of the countryside.

The areas north and south of Balliol Road had been filled with houses by now. Buildings associated with the influx of people were springing up all over the place: Balliol Road Baths, various chapels and recreation grounds, and a football and cricket pitch on Hawthorne Road (now South Park) were just some of the facilities the growing suburb needed. The Northern Recreation Ground first appears on a map in 1894; this later became North Park. The new Liverpool Parochial Cemetery was located in Bootle township, relfecting the more sobering aspects of life in Victorian Liverpool.

Industry was expanding. A rope works had been established near West Derby Workhouse. The whole landscape was criss-crossed with railways: the Liverpool and Bury Railway was extended to Fazakerley in 1867, and the Lancashire and Yorkshire Railway had added the Bootle branch and the Seaforth Connecting Line. This was connected to the Liverpool, Blackburn and Accrington Line to the south of Bootle. All these railways branched off into the goods stations lining the docks. The area formerly filled with riverside houses and pubs was now dominated by industrial buildings – branch lines, goods depots and warehouses.

The docklands were ever-changing and expanding. Canada Dock had grown and become Brocklebank Dock, and Alexandra Dock and Langton Dock were the latest northern expansions. Liverpool’s famous Overhead Railway was extended to Bootle (Seaforth Sands Station) in April 1894 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seaforth_Sands_railway_station).

West Derby workhouse had been completed in 1869. This was the second building by that name, and served the northern part of West Derby Union (http://www.workhouses.org.uk/index.html?WestDerby/WestDerby.shtml). Parts of this building still survive within Walton Hospital, which now occupies the site.

As well as the main areas of Bootle becoming a part of the city of Liverpool, Litherland, the formerly separate village to the north, was becoming built up by 1894. This was becoming a town popular with prosperous businessmen who wanted to escape the smoky, dirty city. The area was handy for the train and tram systems, and yet was semi-rural in feel. As the map shows, houses here were semi-detached but large, with big gardens separating them from their neighbours. This was a common house type for the upper middle classes in the Victorian period in Liverpool, and the pattern could be found in Allerton, West Derby and on the Wirral.

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Pitch, Tar, Carbonic Acid and Parks: Bootle in 1910

Bootle on the Ordnance Survey map of 1910

Bootle on the Ordnance Survey map of 1910

The next available map in the OS series was published not long after the 2nd Edition of 1894, but the landscape is constantly evolving.

Land to the east of the original village, which in 1894 looked like it might be laid out for housing had by now been turned into Derby Park.

Bootle industry now included a pitch and tar works, a smelting works, a carbonic acid gas works, Bootle Foundary, and a wire rope works.

New roads being built hint at Bootle’s aspirations: Hertford and Exeter Roads are named after Oxford colleges. Shakespearian characters inhabit other streets: Othello, Juliet, Macbeth and Romeo all have roads named after them. These names are still there, although the roads have changed shape over the years.

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The hospital, the suburbs and schools: Bootle on the verge of World War Two

Bootle on the Ordnance Survey map of 1938

Bootle on the Ordnance Survey map of 1938

The Ordnance Survey produced another maps of Lancashire just before the Second World War.

This new edition shows Hillside High School, which replaced a handful of large houses, including Breeze Hill House which had given its name to the road which ran east-west to the south of it, and which still bears its name.

The number of houses in the area kept growing, with Orrell Park expanding up to the edge of the Bootle Goods Branch of the London, Midland and Scottish Railway. The West Derby Union Workhouse had now become Walton Hospital.

Industry was still expanding. The wire rope factory seen on the previous map was changing with the times, becoming the Electric Cable Works. A tar distillation works had appeared on the site of the carbonic acid gas works, and tar distillery had opened towards Linacre on Hawthorne Road. Neighbours of this included a rubber works, two tanneries, a lead works and a cooperage. Today this area is still a mass of warehouses, lorry depots and small factories.

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The railways contract, but Bootle goes on: the 20th Century

By the middle of the 20th Century Bootle had settled into the form it is today. What began as the Aintree Sorting Siding had grown into a massive spider’s web of rail on the boundary between the two townships. But the culling of the railways was in full swing by this point, and the 1978 map shows that many had already been abandoned, and were probably becoming overgrown by this time. Even today, some stretches through Bootle and Walton remain green tracks. The bridge over the modern Merseyrail track just north of Lynwood Road is part of one such section which lies just behind the everyday facade of north Liverpool.

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Comments

  1. Jeremy Woods says

    I like your history of Bootle, a place which I have not visited yet! I obtained a copy of a painting for my late father, of Alexander Dock – Bootle during the Second World War. His escort group were shown coming back from an Atlantic patrol.

    Nicolas Monsarrat says in his book “Three Corvettes” –

    “It was curious to think that a large part of the Battle of the Atlantic was fought from this small corner: that if you wiped out this dock and what it had done since the war started, the answer might be a starving Britain.”

    Perhaps Bootle history is a little understated!

  2. Martin says

    Hi Jeremy,
    I think all parts of Liverpool have a hidden part to play in the city’s history, and Bootle, being close to the docks, is certainly no exception! Glad you found the article interesting, and thanks for sharing the quote.
    Martin

  3. says

    I was born in Bootle 38 emery street , i lived in Berry Street when the war was on , my brothers were evacuated to Wales, i had to stay , i remember running over the Coffee House Bridge during the time bombs were dropping going fron shelter to shelter . Our house got a direct hit with me in the celler, the neighbors helped dig me out. i remeber our house got robbed , when we went to a shelter one night, when we got back the next morning the house was compleley empty the even took the nail that held the curtains up. I went to st winifreds school.my mam was pregnant at the time the war was going on ,.our house was on the corner behind a butcher shop, when it got hit i remember smelling the meat cooking it was hanging and was on fire. I dont want my grandchildren to go thru a war like i did, to say that kids forget is bull, i remember every thing about it.i have been in the Staes for 50 years but still a british subject,i go home every once in a while, but i get lost it has changed sooooo much i like the old Liverpool

    • Martin says

      Hi Veronica, thanks for your comments. It’s sounds like what you went through during the war was pretty terrifying. You don’t often hear stories about looting of houses – it’s all Blitz Spirit and stiff upper lips, but they must have been hard times.
      Yes, Liverpool’s changed a great deal. That’s part of the reason why I set up Historic Liverpool and Liverpool Landscapes, to document the changing landscape, and the losses to heritage. The old buildings help us connect to history, so that we remember the lessons of the past. I hope you find the sites interesting.
      Regards,
      Martin

    • Donna says

      My Dad- John McNicholas also went to St Winifride’s,and later St Martin’s. The family lived in Chapel St and were bombed out in the May blitz of 1941. I am looking into the history of Bootle around this time. My mother’s family were also from Bootle-Braesnose Rd, she went to St.Alexander’s school.

      • Libby Egerton (Bevan) says

        Hi Donna, how weird! I was just doing a bit of research into my dad’s family and saw your comment. My Mum was from Oberon St which was off St Johns Rd and she also went to St Alexanders. What year was your mum born? Mine was 1921.
        Hope you’re keeping well, I’ll tell the girls I’ve chatted with you when we go out next. ( Maureen Owens, Hazel Byrom and Pat Lydiate!) x

  4. kath tunstall says

    I play bowls for Linacre Park Ladies team.Always wondered were Linacre Park was.I know LinacreLane, Road and Linacre Chapel but surmise that there must have been a park with a b
    owling green for us to have inherited the team name.we played at the Crescent,Johnson Ave when I joined in 1985 so maybe it was near there.

    • Martin says

      Hi Kath,

      I’ve not been able to find a reference to Linacre Park, although as you say there are a couple of roads around there with the name in.

      The village of Linacre once stood on its own, where Linacre Lane and Stanley Road now join. There was a Linacre House near the junction, so it may be that Linacre Park was a colloquial name for the house and its grounds, even though it’s not marked on the map.

      • pat simpson says

        LINACRE PARK COULD BE THE BOWLING GREEN OPPOSITE jOHNSTON’S DYE WORKS.

        The ground used to be a nursing home first until around the late 80’s? then the Bowling Green was build on field still used as it is today, 2014′

        Both nursing home and bowling green would need an address, so could it be Linacre Park you are looking for for Kath? pat

  5. Vivian Jamieson says

    Hi, found your link on Bootle Past, really interesting read. I was born and brought up in 81 Park Street (now a medical centre I think). My brother lived in Strand House so use to visit quite a bit and the area has changed so much over the years. Quite like wandering around Liverpool city centre with the great buildings and trying to remember what it was like when I was a teenager in the 60’s going out there.

    • Jim Dolce says

      Did you live near to Willie Magee? I lived in Lambs Terrace off Litherland Road less than half a mile from you! What was your maiden name?

  6. says

    Hi martin, i was born in camble st “,bottom of strand rd” can you or any of your readers remember the name of the fella that used to cut hair in his back yard?
    I have fond memories of my dad takin me and my brother when we were little kids,
    on the corner of irlam&strand road, or there abouts .
    thanks
    ps, i am now 50
    so were talkin about
    40yr ago

  7. Jim Brown says

    Hi Martin I tried contacting Frank Sheridan, I think I know Frank if its the same guy with a sister named “Rose”. Tried contacting Frank with the link from this site but the link is not working.
    I can also remember the guy who cut our hair in his back yard…. was his name “Joe Sinnott”

  8. c wells says

    read your article on bootle bootle is not part of liverpool post office tried to put cistencliverpool on the postal address many years a go but bootle council objected and the post office could only put L20 on the postal address bootle was in existence many years before liverpool being mentioned in the doomsday book

    • says

      Thanks for your comment. Well, these things happen often all over the country, and there are always arguments about whether a certain town should be part of its larger neighbour or not. Landscape archaeology is not as concerned with boundaries as local councils can be, and Bootle, as you say, has an ancient and very important contribution to the history of Liverpool, so I’m including it here. Hopefully in the future I’ll be including more areas outside Liverpool, but which have an influence – I mention Kirkby several times already, though it’s not strictly in Liverpool. Thanks again for commenting.
      Martin

      • Peter B. Young says

        As CWells has stated Bootle has never been a “part of Liverpool”. Bootle had it’s own Police Force, until the 1970’s when they merged to become Liverpool & Bootle Constabulary (later Merseyside Police), & Fire Service (again later merging to become Merseyside). These mergers were both political & economic decisions made at the time of merger. Bootle was also awarded County Borough status in it’s own right in 1889, which stood until the creation of Sefton County Council, again a political bandying about in the 1970’s. Prior to these political machinations Bootle thrived as a proud and independent township. It’s only real connection, or association, with Liverpool was when the Post Office rationalised itself and introduced the fore-runner to Post Codes and labelled Bootle as Postal District L20, having made Liverpool Copperass Hill sorting office the main sorting office for the whole region.

  9. Karen Williams says

    Hi Veronica, I read your post with interest as my Mum lived in Berry street during the war, until they Had to move to Sidney road due to the street being too badly damaged. Her name was Kathleen Davies and she about 5 when the war started, she had two older sisters Delia and Mary and a brother Tommy, her mother was Catherine. You probably don’t know them, still it’s nice to share your wartime memories, especially knowing that my Mum’s experience would have been very much the same. Kind regards from England :O) Karen x

    • Kevin Bonnesen says

      Hi Karen, I was wondering if you are related to the Mrs Davies I knew as a youngster who lived at No 30 Sidney Road,I lived at No 28 Sidney and the Mrs Davies I knew did have a daughter called Delia who I believe lives by Johnsons Dye Works.
      Thank you.
      Kevin.

      • Mary Davies says

        HI Kevin, just read your post, I’m Karen’s cousin and our gran did live at No 30 Sidney Road. Delia did live by Johnsons but died several tears ago, my mum is Mary, I must ask her if she remembers you. Do you remember the Warings at no 34 I think. The boys name was Denis?
        Regards
        Mary

  10. says

    Whilst researching my family tree, I have come to this very informative web site. My father and his siblings where all born in Exeter Rd, Bootle, in the early 1900s. The family name was Finnegan, my father being Thomas (Tom). I am trying to find out when properties 68 – 76 Exeter Rd, Bootle 20 where built, does anybody out there know? These properties have recently been demolished I am very sad to say, as they held such very happy memories for us as a family. If anybody can offer any information it would be very much appreciated.

    • says

      Hi Denise,

      The houses you’re interested in were built in the early 1900s, and the 1908 Edition of the Ordnance Survey map shows half the road having been built with the other half still to come. So we can date those houses pretty closely.

      Hope this helps with your research.

      Regards,
      Martin

  11. Mary Davies says

    Would be interested in any pictures of Berry Street Bootle before the war, my mum lived there as a child and is living there in her memory now. Would be nice to show her some photos of how it was.
    Thanks

  12. Kevin Bonnesen says

    Hi Mary,My mum moved to Sidney rd after her house was bombed during the blitz,She lived in Coleridge st next to the timber yard and it all took a hit ,When she moved to Sidney rd her name was kathleen fairclough her sister was patricia and was living with her grand-parents,Even after getting married she stayed at the house until december 1968 then we moved to summers avenue,My mum had four of us little darlings I will put them in order of birth-David-Kevin-Stephen-Pauline, I was speaking to my mum a while back and she said she bumped into Delia and went to see your nan with her, But she cannot remember when, But did remember it was by johnsons, I remember your nan well she was a lovely lady who always said hello,My mum said she liked to be called KITTY, Yes i do remember Dennis Waring -In the hot days of the 6Os he had a wooden barrel in his back yard which he would fill with water and jump in and keep cool,Those were the days! Hope to hear from you soon.regards Kevin

  13. Adam Cree says

    I have an enquiry that perhaps someone can make some suggestions on. I am researching a woman of some importancer to Chorley in Lancashire who was brought up in Bootle – Olive Street but also other streets.

    I wold like to trace her education. I have a pretty strong hunch that she was taught by the Sisters of the Sacret Heart of Mary in Bootle.

    I have found elsewhere that the order sent sisters from Beziers in France to Bootle (and some Irish sisters. A school on Marsh Lane was set up through the pasrish priest of St James’.

    Is the current All Saints’ School the vestige of this foundation?

    Did Bootle have other schools run by the order (apparently ther were some in Liverpool.)

    The website of the order records this at http://www.rshm-nep.org/page-10015-beginnings.html and the American site expands on this same detail at htp://www.rshm.org/History/England_1872 but there are no easy local contacts. There is a photograph at this web site which is unatributed ans if anyone knows its origins I would be interested.

    faith through her actions. I have research her and the memorial books extensively and a gallery is about to open in our local museum. There are still many gaps in her record and I am curious about the roots and expression of her faith – what drove her? I am also curious about her education and her links to Beziers. She may even have had an association with the Sisters of the Sacred Heart of Mary. Her half-sister was a Reverend Mother of the Order of the Holy Child Jesus.

    If anyone could direct me to where records for this original school or previously published material might be found I would be very grateful.

    • says

      Hi Adam,

      I’ve not been able to find too much information on the school in Liverpool, although there is a school marked on the early (19th century) Ordnance Survey maps and a Roman Catholic church, both on Chesnut Grove where the current All Saints Primary School is (although across the road from the modern school building). Perhaps there is a link, although the website of the school does not have any historic information on it.

      Sorry I couldn’t be more helpful, but good luck with your research.

      Martin

    • pat simpson says

      Hi, Adam Martin.

      The name of the school on corner of Marsh Lane and Chestnut Grove was named St James’ Roman Catholic Church, and School the same name which has now amalgamated with All Saints..

      The infant and Junior school stood next to the Church and opposite, on corner of Marsh Lane and Chestnut Grove was the girls senior school.
      The boys were next door and up the stairs over the girls class’ separated by a wall was the main entrance.

      The church started off as a little hut hidden in a short street next to Chestnut Grove. The history of the church can be found by putting name of church and road into search. Pat

  14. David says

    I came to live in back Oregon Street Bootle from Barry South Wales as a small baby boy of three weeks old in February 1944. At five years I went to St Marys School in Irlam Road, then Balliol Road Secondary School until fifteen years. I worked as a butcher boy, on the timber, made toffee, worked in a tin foundry. 1964 Strand Road and surrounding streets were demolished to make way for the New Strand to be built. Life was never the same after that, our whole way of life was gone. Now, today, most of Bootle has been demolished and our live and memories of people who we once played with and loved are all gone. I only found two of my school mates after 1964. I would love to know what happened to all my mates I used to play with as kids in Oregon street in those early years.

    • says

      Hi David,

      That’s a fascinating story – you must have been a part of much of Liverpool’s classic industries! It’s such a shame that communities were broken up and the houses demolished. It happened all over Liverpool and beyond, and life is never the same afterwards. I bet many people would love to go back to a life where communities were tight-knit and familiar.

      Thanks so much for your contribution here.

      Regards,
      Martin

  15. Ian Holmes says

    Bootle has great community in it, is full of history right back to 1086 it was in dooms day book, we are indpendent of Liverpool we just have trade relationship with them like USA an UK so yer my granddad worked at docks an my famliy may have come here in 1086 when Bootle was created so any questions as me i answerthem best as possible enjoy reading.

    • says

      Hi Ian,

      Good to hear the community of Bootle is still going strong! As you say it’s always been a strong trading place, and was considered a ‘coastal’ town when a road led down to the beach before the docks were built. I’ll let people know you can answer some of their questions!

      Regards,
      Martin

  16. Ian Hankin says

    Great read about Bootle martin, have brought my mother back for her 80th from NZ and are staying at Breeze guest House in the old village. Our family lived in klondyke and orrell and some still do. My great gran lived 2 doors along from the Albion pub and went for a pint there last night. Thanks for filling some gaps. Does anybody know where I could get a copy of Images of Bootle and Orrell? The author sadly passed away a few years ago I believe.

    • mick mcbride says

      hi I sat next to mick Prendergast at school we went to st winifrides also in our class was chris crummy who became the drummer with the searchers & johnny McNally lived at 108 st johns road kirkdale

  17. Keith Moulsdale. says

    I lived on garden lane in the prefab on the corner of Lambs terrace from 1945 1953. my best mate was Jimmy Clark who lived on lambs terrace I am trying to contact Jimmy Clark

  18. Mark McGrady says

    Hi is it possible to find any info r.e proctors timber yard which was on corner of strand road,Bootle,by fire bobby station…I’m trying to trace the connollys who worked there? Or more importantly William McGrady who worked there? Thanks

    • says

      Hi Mark,

      As my expertise extends to maps rather than family history, I can show you a map of the area from the late 19th century: . Hope this is of interest, and if you’d like a different era or scale let me know.

      Martin

  19. Margaret Macdonald says

    hi i am trying to find out about a robinsons foundry that was i think on seaforth rd it was a smelting plant, and my late husband did his apprenticeship there

    • John Hayden says

      Did you find out what you wanted to know about Robinson’s foundry?

      It was
      A Robinson & Co Ltd.
      Knowsley Road Bootle.

      The Foundry was in Akenside Street Bootle, just down the road from Robinson’s works and main office building on the corner of Knowsley Road. T
      his was opposite the Winefred Hotel (now called the Gateway Hotel)

  20. Paul Towns says

    Bootle is a horrible dump, were the residents claim to be from Liverpool. It is no moore part of Liverpool than Freshfields is. That is why the road signs say Liverpool on them when directing you towards Liverpool. Yet in Liverpool they say city centre!

  21. Davey says

    Ay Paul, you may be right, but from where I come from, Bottle is no different to the surrounding areas of Kirkdale, Walton, Anfield, Everton, Scotty Road…do you want me to go on???

    You see, you’ve just shown what a two-bob snob you are as all these areas are probably within no further distance than 2-3 miles apart with many of them adjacent to each other.

    That doesn’t bother me though, as I’m proud that I’m from Bootle and Merseyside, and I’m proud that I border the City which I love, but before you post your snide remarks from your little hamlet in Mossley Hill (or wherever you’re from), think about many of the people you’ve insulted from YOUR city of Liverpool.

    There’s absolutely no difference in the people.

    We’re all proud mongrels and descendants of different cultures and races and that’s what makes us what we are.

    Some though, forget where they do come from with this arrogance and snobbery.

    Get me?

  22. Libby Egerton (Bevan) says

    I have just been given a copy of my Great Uncle’s certificate of his death. He was only 20 when killed in France in 1917 in 1st war. His name was Frank Clarke Bevan and his name is engraved on the War Memorial in King’s Park. The certificate shows his mother and father’s address as 2 Breeze Hill Bootle. Does anyone know if that address still exists? Thank you

    • kevin bonnesen says

      2 Breeze Hill has long gone and new buildings now stand there, If you have google earth you can look around yourself if you like, Its is opposite the church were the property once stood, Hope this is of help to you, Kevin.

  23. shirley greene says

    im interested of anyone who lived around the sausage factory in literland in and around 1923 onwards, my family history goes back to my great grandmother who lived by the sausage works around 1923 when my father was born until her death in 1933, her name was lillian martha ann levey, she was previously married to a jack finchett, so she would of been lillian finchett, never knew her as she died in 1933 of stomach cancer and my dad and his sister doreen and his brother eric were all sent into work houses, if anyone has any information i would be over the moon, her husband was thomas levey, her father was harry onslow and her mother was mary onslow, or tabitha (not quite sure), on my mothers side , my mother was mary campbell, she had a sister patricia, they were brought up in dryden street in bootle, around 1935 until her marriage to my dad harry levey in 1951, anyone have any information no matter how small i would be so pleased to hear, intrigued to know anything, many thanks, shirley

    • Flo Hemmings,(nee) Valentine says

      Hello Shirley, I lived in 11 Dryden St,from 1941/1960,and although I was several years younger than your Mum I remember her and your grandmother most.I can`t tell you much only that they were always friendly and had time to chat to a kid playing in the street (me).I have in front of me this moment a card sent to me on the occasion of my marriage in 1960.It`s signed Mrs M Campbell,so I assume her name was also Mary.

  24. shirley greene says

    anyone know of the anderson family from bootle area, more so i am particularly interessted in a Jimmy anderson? or his family, i know little of him apart from i am told he was a taxi driver i think around the 60s and 70s, i know he had sisters , not sure where in bootle , any information on the family or jimmy inparticular please let me know, many thanks, shirley

  25. mick mcbride says

    I have an old map that shows church st &seaforth st but inbetween is bostock street can any tell me when it became kirk st I lived at 38 from 1946 till they wre pulled down in the fifties

  26. WILLIAM Davies says

    Hi, What a great easy to use site with interesting facts and comments. I am not a native of Bootle being brought up in Huyton 1942-1956. My elder sister married a wonderful Bootle man and had a long and happy marriage. Sadly he died some 9 years ago and is badly missed. Being much younger than him I was always interested in his stories of Bootle him being born there in the parish of St. Winifreds. His name was Christopher Wilde born 1923, served in the merchant navy from the age of 14 years and was involved in the Atlantic Convoys finishing up as a chef. He sailed with Elder Dempsters and Bibby’s amongst others and swallowed the anchor about 1960.
    As a surprise for my sister and his only daughter I thought I would like to compile a family history for them having done my side of the family.
    Chris’s father was Nicholas Wilde, his mother Winifred Connoly, his grandfather lawrence Wilde, born Lough Shinney, Ireland. Winifred’s sister Margaret, married a ” Kelly ” their children being Chris’s cousins, now I think are all deceased but their children, Chris’s 2ndcousins may still be in Bootle.

    It would be wonderful if anyone knows of the family of Wilde’s, Connoly and Kelly and could pass on any memories.

    Thank You, Bill Davies

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